zeldathemes
Strength over fear
Alison / 22 / MN.WI /
Prepare for ladies. Mostly ass-kicking ladies and lesbian fandom or canon. / / Trigger warning for eating disorder talk, all of which is tagged. Supposedly on the way to recovery. / / feel free to message me, I love new friends
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plays

Sam Smith | I’m Not The Only Feat. Dianna Agron & Chris Messina

Thank you SO much to @nicolequintos for sending me the video.

***Once the video is on YouTube, I will be editing this post with that version and deleting this from my account***

  #oh no    #dianna agron    #i love your face so much    #i have so many feelings  
What I’ve Learned:
1. A girl can lose feelings for you over night.
2. A kiss can be just that, a kiss. Completely meaningless.
3. Love can be one sided but I still wonder if that is love at all
4. Never beg for someone to stay or to love you. You shouldn’t have to beg for someone to be a part of your life or to love you. You deserve better than that.
5. Stop breaking your ribs to make space for those who do not belong there.
6. Learning to breathe again is harder than the doctors said it would be.
7. I don’t know what hurts more at night; being alone or being in love.
8. Laying with someone in bed at night is temporary. It won’t get rid of the lonely. You will still wake up and leave in the morning with a heavy heart and no hand to hold.
9. Sometimes the sky rains gasoline instead of water and you have to be strong enough and ignore the urge to set yourself on fire.
10. I will be okay someday. Bad things happen for no reason sometimes and things end but that shouldn’t mean you should come to an end too. The ocean will always have waves; I just have to learn to swim through them for a bit longer.
11. The stretch marks I left on my mother from birth will not be another suicide letter I never finished.
Oliver Nolau (via cybergirlfriend)

brookietf:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

paperseverywhere:

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And then I find out the fanfic hasn’t updated for over a year.

WE CAN ALL RELATE TO THIS POST

OH GOD THIS JUST STARTED HAPPENING TO MEEEEEE

browntitan:

crossfitters:

Jessica Estrada

She is bad ass!!

minuiko:

This took me an embarrassingly long time to finish (got the commission about half a year ago…), but it’s finally done! Daine, Alanna, and Kel in fancy dresses with their weapons of choice, for dredreidel :)

minuiko:

This took me an embarrassingly long time to finish (got the commission about half a year ago…), but it’s finally done! Daine, Alanna, and Kel in fancy dresses with their weapons of choice, for dredreidel :)

  #tamora pierce    #holy trinity    #Wowowow  

sadsofia:

mister-nobody:

B E A U T Y :: by Rino Stefano Tagliafierro

daeranilen:

daeranilen:

Earlier today, I served as the “young woman’s voice” in a panel of local experts at a Girl Scouts speaking event. One question for the panel was something to the effect of, "Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

I was surprised when the first panelist answered the question as if it were about cyberbullying. The adult audience nodded sagely as she spoke about the importance of protecting children online.

I reached for the microphone next. I said, “As far as reading your child’s texts or logging into their social media profiles, I would say 99.9% of the time, do not do that.”

Looks of total shock answered me. I actually saw heads jerk back in surprise. Even some of my fellow panelists blinked.

Everyone stared as I explained that going behind a child’s back in such a way severs the bond of trust with the parent. When I said, “This is the most effective way to ensure that your child never tells you anything,” it was like I’d delivered a revelation.

It’s easy to talk about the disconnect between the old and the young, but I don’t think I’d ever been so slapped in the face by the reality of it. It was clear that for most of the parents I spoke to, the idea of such actions as a violation had never occurred to them at all.

It alarms me how quickly adults forget that children are people.

Apparently people are rediscovering this post somehow and I think that’s pretty cool! Having experienced similar violations of trust in my youth, this is an important issue to me, so I want to add my personal story:

Around age 13, I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me “not to joke about things like that.” I stopped telling my mother when I felt depressed.

Around age 15, I caught my mother reading my diary. She confessed that any time she saw me write in my diary, she would sneak into my room and read it, because I only wrote when I was upset. I stopped keeping a diary.

Around age 18, I had an emotional breakdown while on vacation because I didn’t want to go to college. I ended up seeing a therapist for - surprise surprise - depression.

Around age 21, I spoke on this panel with my mother in the audience, and afterwards I mentioned the diary incident to her with respect to this particular Q&A. Her eyes welled up, and she said, “You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?”

TL;DR: When you invade your child’s privacy, you communicate three things:

  1. You do not respect their rights as an individual.
  2. You do not trust them to navigate problems or seek help on their own.
  3. You probably haven’t been listening to them.

Information about almost every issue that you think you have to snoop for can probably be obtained by communicating with and listening to your child.

gailsimone:


the preeminent gail simone of our time

Still a huge problem.

gailsimone:

the preeminent gail simone of our time

Still a huge problem.

daydreamsandgigglesstudios:

Do you wanna build a snowman?

SDCC 2014

wordstoash:

1 hr speedpaint of Asami boxing

wordstoash:

1 hr speedpaint of Asami boxing